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Windows Vista is dead

Discussion in 'Windows Vista' started by starbuck, Apr 11, 2017.

  1. starbuck

    starbuck Administrator - Malware Removal Specialist Administrator

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    After Today (April 11), Vista will be unsupported forever.

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    After April 11, 2017, Microsoft will no longer support Windows Vista: no new security updates, non-security hotfixes, free or paid assisted support options, or online technical content updates, Microsoft says.
    (Mainstream Vista support expired in 2012.)
    Like it did for Windows XP, Microsoft has moved on to better things after a decade of supporting Vista.

    As Microsoft notes, however, running an older operating system means taking risks—and those risks will become far worse after the deadline.
    Vista’s Internet Explorer 9 has long since expired, and the lack of any further updates means that any existing vulnerabilities will never be patched—ever.
    Even if you have Microsoft’s Security Essentials installed—Vista’s own antivirus program—you’ll only receive new signatures for a limited time.

    The good news is that only a handful of computer users will have to make the switch.
    According to NetMarketshare, the desktop share of Windows Vista was just under 2 percent two years ago, in March, 2015.
    Today, it’s at 0.78 percent—about half of Windows 8’s 1.65 percent, according to the firm.
    (A certain percentage of Windows users simply don’t care, however; Windows XP’s market share stands above 8 percent, and support for that operating system expired in April, 2014.)

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    Vista was never one of Microsoft’s beloved operating systems, although PCWorld reviewers were certainly kind.
    Annoyances like the User Access Control and the introduction of Digital Rights Management played a role in hurrying user adoption of its successor, Windows 7, though Vista’s desktop gadgets were certainly nice.
    (Extended support for Windows 7 ends in January, 2020, incidentally.)

    Naturally, Microsoft hopes that any users moving from Windows Vista will migrate to Windows 10.
    Microsoft is even offering the Laplink migration software for half off, or $14.95.
    The important thing, though, is to move from Windows Vista to something more modern.

    Why this matters:
    Even if you're not part of the small group clinging to Windows Vista, its demise reinforces Microsoft's efforts to pull Windows users into the present day.
    Other software companies are following suit: Firefox has let go of XP and Vista users.
    Google Drive is kicking them to the curb. Windows Vista isn’t safe, it wasn’t loved, and the risk that some site will steal your email or bank account information is real.
    It’s time to move on.


    Source:
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/3180...-has-just-30-days-to-live.html#tk.rss_windows
     
  2. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    This has nothing to do with security risks, as infections have no regard to the operating system, updates, antivirus, or browser. Such is the most common myth in the computer industry.

    What this has to do with is money and profit . I'll elaborate if requested.
     
  3. Mart

    Mart Registered Members

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    I never had Vista (stayed with XP) but as the article more or less says, it falls into the class of 'unloved Microsoft operating systems'. This being along with Windows ME and Windows 8. Perhaps Vista won't be missed too much.

    There are always those who didn't mind Vista and Windows 8 though. This must run in my family because my Son thought Vista was OK and I thought Windows 8 was usable enough. :)
     
  4. DSTM (Dougie)

    DSTM (Dougie) Registered Members

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    Windows 8 was such a disaster, Microsoft fired Steven Sinofsky. Head of Windows Division at Microsoft.
    Seems like every second OS release from Microsoft hasn't been popular.
    I jumped Vista.
     
  5. Mart

    Mart Registered Members

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    Windows 8 was such a shock with its tiled interface that most decided it was a bad move by Microsoft. In a way though, it was an almost necessary OS as a transition from the traditional cascading menu interface that had been around since Windows 95, to the current Windows 10 interface. I may be wrong but I think there is more of an acceptance of tiles now than there used to be. Maybe that wouldn't be the case unless the tiles had been introduced somewhere and somehow. I now much prefer the Windows 10 arrangement of shortcuts for opening programs than that of Windows 7.

    The OS beneath Windows 8's tiled interface ran my programs very well and whatever way the programs had to be opened was secondary to that. With Windows 7, it was cascaded menus and a list of most used program icons above that. With Windows 8 it was tiles that could be expanded across the whole Desktop. I found I could work with either interface.

    My Son used to say that Vista was OK if you had computer specifications that were high enough to run it. At the time, I think a lot of people didn't and so it was found to be a generally slow OS for many.
     
    Last edited: Apr 14, 2017
  6. DSTM (Dougie)

    DSTM (Dougie) Registered Members

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    I am quite happy with Windows7, Mart. All my shortcuts to programs and Websites on the Desktop.
    Why change something that people like and works well? A pie chart of the Worlds favourite OS's shows Windows7 a clear leader. Windows 10 hasn't taken off as Microsoft had expected even with their forcing it down our throats. I expected a complete new OS with Windows10, instead of a Service Pack they could easily have added to Windows8.1. I have Windows10 on one computer only to help members with Windows10 issues. My default OS is Windows7 SP1 and will stay that way for a long time to come.
     
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  7. Mart

    Mart Registered Members

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    I know that lots of people feel that way about Windows 7 Dougie even though, like Windows 10, it wasn't much liked by many at the time of its release. This seems to be something that happens with new MS Windows operating systems. It did with XP too.

    I'm not sure that change is always for the best but over time, we did go from Windows 3.11 to Windows 7. This is only because Microsoft kept making (sometimes unpopular) changes to their operating systems. I think most would now agree that Windows 7 is far better than Windows 3.11, even though 3.11 did the job and people at the time didn't want to change. However, I suppose we'd never have got to Windows 7 without Microsoft progressing from one operating system to the next. Software evolvement goes on and overall, I think we do benefit from it. Windows 10 is just the next Microsoft OS along and although nobody can predict the future, I'd expect it to be become as acceptable as previous operating systems a number of years down the line.

    I may be a bit unusual in always wanting to run the latest OS but I do find them an interest and usually, they aren't as bad as read about on the Internet in my opinion. Maybe I'm too easily pleased. :)
     
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  8. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    The main issue with Vista was not Vista itself, but rather the computer manufacturers. That is, OEM's slapping on "Vista Ready" stickers, when the system either didn't have enough power to run Vista properly, or the some of the hardware wasn't compatible. Then there's the issue of the whole upgrade idea. I don't know of any tech that would recommend replacing an operating system while another operating system installed (an upgrade). That's just asking for trouble. For me, it was always a clean install of the operating system or don't fix what isn't broke.

    The main issue with W8 was not W8 itself, but rather Microsoft's bizarre decision to have W8 to boot to tile mode. When a person booted up the W8 system, it didn't even ask if you wanted to boot to Desktop mode or Tile mode. It just went to Tile mode and left everyone asking, "What the !!$@&@ is this"?
     
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  9. Mart

    Mart Registered Members

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    I agree with you Seth. I think you hit the nail on the head regarding hardware and Vista in the first paragraph. It pretty much fits in with my Son's opinion, so I'd better agree. :)

    It would have been better it there was an option to boot W.8 (.1) to the Desktop. The switching between Desktop and tiled screen was a nuisance. It was one I got used to, so didn't ask "What the !!$@&@ is this"? but think that W.10 has addressed the problem quite well ..in view of the fact that Microsoft are staying with the tiled Start Menu one way or another.
     

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