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When to pronounce it dead

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Hardware' started by Tony D, Jun 4, 2018.

  1. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    So when do you just pronounce it dead?

    A desktop machine comes in and there's nothing on the screen. The standby light on the display doesn't even change color which tells me it doesn't sense that it's receiving a signal from the computer.

    The fans start up. The hard drive spins up but I don't hear the head trying to access the drive to load the OS. I can hold the power button and the machine shuts down.

    I've tried both the VGA and DVI video ports on two separate monitors. No response with either.
    I've pulled RAM, one stick at a time until both were out hoping to maybe hear a beep. No beep.
    I've swapped the power supply. Same symptom.
    I've pulled optical drive and the only expansion card which was a wireless NIC. Same symptom.

    At this point, it has to be either the board or CPU or both. The board looks nice. No bad looking caps. The machine is only 18 months old. This is a Power Spec B335 http://www.microcenter.com/product/459329/b335_desktop_computer

    The CPU is a Pentium G4400.
    The board is an ASRock H110M-HDV.

    Any suggestions as to what else to try?
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2018
  2. DSTM (Dougie)

    DSTM (Dougie) CHF Adviser CHF Advisers

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    Check the CPU pins on the mobo, as well, Tony.
    You never know, someone may have been playing, "Mr Fixit'
    I would also unscrew the mobo off the risers, lift a little, and make sure nothing has fell behind the mobo, shorting out the board.
     
    allheart55 (Cindy E) likes this.
  3. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    It's the mobo. Which in most cases means not worth repair.

    EDIT- Just saw only 18 month old, so it might be worth repair.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2018
  4. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    I'm inclined to repair it. The board is about $60 at Newegg. Problem I've always had is how do you know if it's the board or the CPU? I have some older P4 CPU which I know are good. Don't know if they'll fit on this board until I remove the current one.
     
  5. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    The mobo is infinitely more prone to failure than a cpu. Of the dozens of mobo's that I had to replace with this exact issue, I've never once encountered a failed cpu.
     
  6. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    Something else...

    Do you have a video card to plug in which will bypass the mobo's video circuit?
     
  7. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    I just tried (at your suggestion) a video card in a PCI Express 3 slot. No joy. Nothing on the screen.
    The biggie is that I don't hear the hard drive trying to load the OS. It spins up, but that's it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2018
  8. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    Time for a mobo.
     
  9. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    I hate it when that happens.
     
  10. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    TV ready
    Power Supply:
    Mouse on a wheel
    Ya, it's a PITA.

    I avoid doing it as much as possible. As such, I haven't replaced a mobo in about 10 years:)

    I charged $150.00 for the install + the mobo cost.
     

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