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Proprietary ssd power cable connector on Inspiron 3670?

Discussion in 'Miscellaneous Hardware' started by 8biosdrive, Mar 3, 2019.

  1. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    I began to install a 500 Gb Samsung 860 Evo ssd yesterday. In examining the system board, I saw that the connector for the ssd drive power cable had two rows of 3 pins and didn't match the cables in the set I had purchased, which has the standard straight 6-pin connector. The board connectors are numbered 5 and 8 in the diagram here https://www.dell.com/support/manual...e92321-81fc-4c0b-970d-1da1c0170955&lang=en-us. I was surprised to find that it was very difficult to find a matching cable while searching online. And I saw some posts about others who were frustrated in facing the same problem. I assume I can get the cable from Dell, but they advertise whole kits for adding an ssd that include the ssd, cables, etc. I did find one cable that looks like it should work, but it's advertised as "only compatible for DELL Vostro 3653 3650 3655 3252." https://www.amazon.com/Eyeboot-6-Pin-Power-Supply-CD-ROM/dp/B01N9O5MCK. Thanks for any suggestions.
     
  2. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    I would not use those power connectors on the board to power your SSD. If there is a spare SATA power connector coming from the power supply, use that. If there isn't a spare power connector, get a power cable splitter like this https://www.amazon.com/Latching-Power-Splitter-Cable-Adapter/dp/B00BBDL17G/ref=sr_1_4?crid=1C8N4AI8E2PNX&keywords=sata+power+splitter&qid=1551627294&s=electronics&sprefix=sata+power+,electronics,143&sr=1-4

    The power connector is the longer connector on your SSD. It has 15 pins by my count. The data connector has 6 pins.
     
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  3. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    Thanks Tony, that's very helpful. I will check the connections at the power supply, but I don't think there's a spare SATA connector. Things are pretty bare bones inside the computer--no extra of anything. Very different from the Dimension 8300 which came with a number of extra power and data (IDE) connectors. There are two 2.5 inch mounting spots on the chasis, and I was going to use the one further from the power supply, since things are less cluttered there. If 6 inches is too short, I suppose they make these splitters with longer lengths. Would this one work? https://www.amazon.com/Benfei-Power...d=1551628780&s=electronics&sr=1-2-spons&psc=1

    Other than the difficulty in finding a cable with that 2x3-pin connector, are there other reasons for not using the power connectors on the board?
     
  4. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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  5. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    The splitter in your post #3 will work. If there are no spare SATA power connectors coming from the power supply, remove the power connector going to the present hard drive. Connect that splitter to the power supply cable that you just removed from the hard drive. Now, you have two connector that can supply power to 1) your hard drive and 2) your SSD.

    If there is a spare SATA power connector coming from the power supply, skip that splitter. Connect that spare SATA power connector to your SSD and you're done.

    I'll bet there is a spare SATA power connector coming from the power supply.

    That procedure in post #4 is for replacing the power supply. It has no relevance to adding an SSD.
     
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  6. allheart55 (Cindy E)

    allheart55 (Cindy E) Administrator Administrator

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    You have 4 SATA connections on this board, 2, 3 6 and 7.
    How many are in use?
     
  7. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    I think 2 are in use one for the hard drive and one for the optical drive. I'll look at the system again this evening. I know from looking yesterday that at least two are free.
     
  8. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    OK, let's keep power connections separate from data connections. Use the connectors on the board for data. Use connections from the power supply for power.
     
  9. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    DSCN5456.JPG DSCN5457.JPG
    I took a good look at the system and took some pictures to clarify. In the bottom picture you see the cables coming from the power supply. There are two bundles of wires; the first consist of 8 wires that connect to the 4x4 pin white connector at the upper right corner of the board, which is labeled "ATX SYS." The second bundle of 2 yellow and 2 black wires connects to a white 2x2 connector (partially obstructed by the blue data cable in the bottom picture) and then goes around the chasis to a 2x2 white connector which connects to the board and is labeled "ATX CPU." There are no SATA connectors coming out of the power supply. In the bottom picture you can see 5 black wires coming out of the hard drive which connect to the SATA power 3x3 black connector in the board (seen in the top picture). The blue data cable from the hard drive connects to the SATA 0 data port (bottom picture). The black and red power wires (in the top picture) from the optical drive seem to be spliced together and attach to one of the pins in the same SATA power connector that the hard drive is connected to. The orange data wire (in the top picture) also comes from the optical drive and is attached to the SATA 2 data port. So, any splicing for a SSD would appear to have to be to the white 2x2 connector behind the blue data cable in the bottom picture. Otherwise it seems it would have to be directly connected to the free SATA power port to the right of the occupied one. I'm not sure if I can remove the connector to the top of the hard drive or what type of connector would match it. Isn't this whole arrangement very non-traditional, almost proprietary? Thanks for any suggestions for attaching the SSD to the power supply.
     
  10. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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  11. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    Well, that's new. I haven't seen a power supply without power connections for the drives before. This is not your standard ATX power supply.

    I see two ways to go.

    1) Pull the power connector off the hard drive and install a splitter cable so you can power both the hard drive and the SSD. This is the splitter I'm talking about https://www.amazon.com/Latching-Pow...cs&sprefix=sata+power+,electronics,143&sr=1-4
    - or
    2) Pick up that adapter cable from Amazon which will allow you to power the SSD directly from the system board. Use the spare SATA power connector next to the white connector (labeled 8 in that Dell sheet in your post #1.)

    I was wondering if using option 1 there would not be enough power from the board to power both the SSD and hard drive. But then, look at that adapter cable from Amazon, it has two power connectors. So you'd think you could power both the SSD and hard drive from the board.
    I'm not sure which option to use. I'm leaning toward option #2.
     
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  12. IJAC

    IJAC Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    It looks like this cable would plug into the motherboard to power the Sata drives. From the picture that 8biosdrive showed in his previous post. Up at the top where it says Sata power unless I am totally missing something here correct me if I am wrong. The hard drive he has in there now plugs to the motherboard for power and into the Sata drive. I've never came across one like that before but sometimes Dell does out of the ordinary things. The cable he has shown on Amazon would work for him.
     
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  13. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    Yes, I think this is a good way to go. Since IJAC also thinks this cable will work (and that's my gut feeling too), I'll order it and then go ahead with the SSD installation. Thanks very much for the help! But, Tony, what was your original concern with powering the SSD from the motherboard?
     
  14. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    My concern is that I don't like to funnel power from the board. It's better to take power directly from the power supply. In your case, you have no option. So then, I'm concerned that funneling too much power via the board ... well, the power is going thru circuit board runs instead of actual wires. How much power was that board designed to deliver? That's a question for Dell.
     
  15. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    Yes, I take your point. But, there are two 2.5-inch mounting spots for hdds (ssds) on the front of the chasis, and Dell sells their own ssd kits, so I would think there should be enough power. But could the additional power running through the board take a toll over time and shorten it's life? Is this planned obsolescence? Unlike the Dimension 8300 which had a lot of room inside, things with the 3670 have become greatly miniturized. You almost need a microscope to distinguish individual circuits!
     
  16. Tony D

    Tony D Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    I agree.

    I can't be sure. I didn't design the board and I don't have the schematics or building spec. That said, if Dell designed the board to power an additional SSD, you should be fine. Besides, you have no other options.
     
  17. IJAC

    IJAC Super-Moderator Super Moderators

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    Also I think the SS Drives consume less power but I am not totally sure so don't quote me on that.If Dell designed for that then like was said should be OK. Plus with that power supply you don't have much choice like Tony said.
     
  18. Seth Anthony

    Seth Anthony Registered Members

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    Either of the 2 suggested options will work.

    Dell :bnghd:
     
  19. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    Thanks for all the advice. I ordered the cable. I'll let you know how it goes.
     
  20. 8biosdrive

    8biosdrive Registered Members

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    I'm happy to report that the setup of the ssd went great! I installed and connected the ssd to the free power socket using the power cable in post #10. I was concerned because although everyone here thought this cable should work, the distributor of the cable told me in a brief email that it was not compatible due to a different connector (so much for accurate information from the distributor of the product!). However, after connecting the power and data cables to the ssd, and disconnecting the power and data cables from the hdd and optical drive, I was able to install Windows 10 from the Dell recovery drive without any problems. After reconnecting the hdd and optical drive, the system sees the ssd at the boot drive (C) and the hdd (which still has Windows 10 on it) as D. Dell told me to remove Win 10 from the hdd, but I know from my older system that there is an advantage to having the operating system on both internal drives, just in case you need to boot from the other one in an emergency. Do you think this will present any problems? Thanks again for all the help.
     

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